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“Design is not for philosophy, it is for life”

Issey Miyake

 
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Implementation and optimization of an intuitive digital user experience to take and view 360 images

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COMING SOON //

Detailing and manufacturing a user friendly, mass producible 360 photo camera

 
 
 

Implementation and optimization of an intuitive digital user experience to take and view 360 images

Panono is a Berlin based startup that developed and manufactures a 360 photo camera which takes fully spherical images with an image quality of 108MP. Alongside the hardware Panono develops an app that can be used to take and process images; stitching software to create seamless images; and a website to view and organize the images. As Panono’s Head of Design I collaborated with a freelance UX and graphic designer and the inhouse developers to create an intuitive user experience on Panono’s app and website.

 
The Panono user experience was implemented on the several elements of the product system

The Panono user experience was implemented on the several elements of the product system

 

Complex workflow

Once the team had decided on a workflow that would work from a user and a technical perspective (see Panono Concept Design) we collaborated to bring the app and website designs to life. My job, as part of the UX team, was to regularly check on progress made by the developers, test different version of the products with users and iterate on the designs when necessary. Our main concern was to keep the complex workflow consistent and understandable over the different touchpoints of the product system.

 
The Panono workflow consists of multiple steps

The Panono workflow consists of multiple steps

 


The Panono camera consists of 36 individual camera modules which all take an image simultaneously. These 36 images need to be processed and stitched together in the cloud before the user can view a finished 360 picture on their account. As the camera itself does not have a screen and cannot connect to the internet, a mobile phone and the Panono app is used to select and send images to the cloud. We developed a three step process which was used to structure and communicate the workflow to users in different parts of the product system.

STEP 1 – Connect camera to smartphone

Connecting the camera to a smartphone allows users to access images on the camera, preview them and select those they wanted to transfer to the phone. As its most important feature, the connection to the camera got a central place in the app.

 
 
Different screens of the Panono app

Different screens of the Panono app

The three step process in the Panono app

The three step process in the Panono app

 
 

STEP 2 – Send images to the cloud

Once images were downloaded to the phone, the user connects their phone to the internet in order to send the unprocessed images to the cloud. Status of the uploads can be followed in the processing section of the app and website.

STEP 3 – View and edit finished images

Processed images can be viewed, shared and edited on the user’s account. Basic functions are implemented in the app so users can share and edit images on the go. For more complicated functions or when editing large amounts of images the website offers more tools.

 
 
Product manuals were developed to assist users when they used the products for the first time

Product manuals were developed to assist users when they used the products for the first time

Editing images on the Panono website

Editing images on the Panono website

 

Want to know more?

Check out this review of the Panono camera and workflow

Or read more about the concept design phase of Panono’s app and website